This guide explains the coronavirus situation in Berlin. It is updated when there is new information.

2G, 2G+ and 3G rules

  • 3G means vaccinated, recovered or tested.
  • 2G means vaccinated or recovered1. If you are under 19 years old, you only need a recent negative test1. If you can't get vaccinated for medical reasons, you only need a recent negative test1.
  • 2G+ means 2G plus a test or a booster1. If you are vaccinated or recovered, you also need a recent negative test. If you are vaccinated with a booster, you don't need a test. If you are vaccinated and recovered, it looks like you still need a test1.

    This is what those words mean:

    • Vaccinated (geimpft) means that you received all doses of your vaccine at least 14 days ago1. This means 1 dose of Johnson&Johnson, or 2 doses of other vaccines.
    • Vaccinated with a booster means that you received all doses of your vaccine, plus a booster vaccine (Auffrischimpfung). You are considered boosted as soon as you get a booster vaccine. You don't need to wait1.
    • Recovered (genesen) means that you have a positive PCR test that is 28 to 180 days old1. Positive rapid antigen tests are not enough. You are also recovered if you have a positive test over 180 months old and a vaccine dose that in the last 14 to 180 days1.
    • Tested (getestet) means that you have a negative PCR or rapid antigen test. The test must be less than last 24 hours old1.

    Latest restrictions

    These are the recent changes to coronavirus restrictions. The full list of restrictions is on Berlin.de. You can also follow rbb24, Tagesspiegel, or the press releases from the Berlin mayor.

    Changes on January 22

    • Indoor sports are now 2G+
    • Self-isolation rules changed (for infected people):
      • If you were infected, self-isolation ends after 10 days.
      • If you were infected, self-isolation can end after 7 days if you have a negative PCR or rapid antigen test.
    • Quarantine rules (for travellers and people in contact with infected people) changed:
      • If you were in contact infected people, quarantine it ends after 10 days.
      • If you have a negative PCR test or rapid antigen test, it can end after 7 days.
      • If you have a booster vaccine, you don't need to quarantine unless you are infected.
      • If you were vaccinated in the last 3 months, you don't need to quarantine unless you are infected.
      • If you recovered from coronavirus in the last 3 months, you don't need to quarantine unless you are infected.
      • If you are a teacher or a student, and you have a negative PCR test or certified rapid antigen test, quarantine ends after 5 days.

    Source: Berlin.de

    Changes on January 15

    • 2G+ now means "vaccinated with a booster vaccine", "vaccinated with a negative test", or "recovered with a negative test".
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are now 2G+. They will require a booster vaccine, or a vaccine and a negative test.
    • Public transport: You must wear an FFP2 mask on public transport. A regular surgical mask is not enough.
    • Indoor events with more than 10 people are now 2G+. Children under 14 years old are not counted.
    • Education: you need a negative test to attend classes in person.
    • Small businesses: employees can verify your test or vaccination certificate after you enter, instead of at the door.

    Source: Berlin.de, rbb24, Tagesspiegel

    Changes on January 14

    • Quarantine rules changed:
      • If you were in contact with an infected person, but you have a booster vaccine, you don't need to quarantine.
      • The quarantine is now 10 days, instead of 14 days. You can leave quarantine after 7 days if you have a negative PCR test. Children can leave quarantine after 5 days if they have a negative PCR test.

    Source: rbb24

    Changes on December 28

    • Meeting people: If you are vaccinated, you can meet up to 10 vaccinated people in private. This applies inside and outside. If you are not vaccinated, you can only meet 2 people from 1 other household. Children under 15 years old are not counted.
    • New Year's Eve: Large gatherings are banned in 53 areas in Berlin. Fireworks are banned. The city might organise a fireworks show.
    • Big events like football matches have no spectators.
    • Indoor events are limited to 200 people, or 2000 people if the event follows the Hygienerahmenkonzept.
    • Outdoor events are limited to 1000 people, or 3000 people if the event follows the Hygienerahmenkonzept.
    • Dancing is also banned in outdoor spaces. Clubs can stay open.
    • Booster vaccines are available for 12 to 18 years old children. They can get a booster 3 months after their last vaccination1.

      Source: Berlin.de

      Changes on December 20

      • Booster vaccines: You can get a booster vaccine 3 months after your last vaccine. Before, it was 5 months. If you had the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you can get a booster after 28 days.

      Source: Berlin.de

      Changes on December 15

      • Children from 5 to 11 years old can get vaccinated in vaccination centres, schools and museums.

      Source: Tagesspiegel

      Changes on December 8

      • Restaurants and bars stay open.
      • Clubs stay open, but dancing is not allowed indoors1. Dancing is allowed outdoors, but the 2G rules apply.
      • Christmas markets stay open, but the 2G rules apply1. Before, it was 3G.
      • Public office buildings: the 3G rules apply. This includes the Bürgeramt, Finanzamt and Ausländerbehörde.
      • Public transport: the 3G rules also apply on train platforms and ferry terminals.
      • Unvaccinated people can only meet at home. They can only invite 2 people from another household. Children under 15 years old are not counted.
      • Outdoor events are limited to 1000 people. The limit is 5000 if the event follows the Hygienerahmenkonzept.
      • Indoor events are limited to 200 people. The limit is 2500 if the event follows the Hygienerahmenkonzept.
      • Outdoor sports: if a 1.5m distance is not possible, the 3G rules apply.
      • Libraries and archives: the 2G rule applies.

      There could be more changes during the day.

      Source: Berlin.de, Tagesspiegel, rbb24

        Full list of restrictions

        Travelling to Berlin

        Coronavirus vaccines

          Vaccine certificates

          You must bring your vaccination certificate with you when you go out. You can also use the CovPass app.

          If you come from outside the EU, your vaccine certificate is valid in Germany, even if it doesn't have a QR code. You can convert your foreign vaccine certificate into a EU certificate at any pharmacy (Apotheke). You must bring your certificate, your passport, and sometimes a registration certificate. Many pharmacies don't convert vaccine certificates, so you must try different pharmacies1, 2, 3. Some Americans find it hard to convert their American vaccine certificates. The pharmacy at BER airport converts American vaccine certificates1.

          Booster vaccines

          After some time, your vaccine does not work as well. This calculator tells you if you vaccine still works well. If you got your second vaccine more than 5 months ago, you can get a booster vaccine (Auffrischungsimpfung)1.

          You can get a booster vaccine in those places1:

          Coronavirus tests

          You can get a free rapid antigen test, even if you don't live in Berlin. PCR tests are not free. Use the official map of test locations, or the list of test locations run by the city.

          Which tests are accepted?

          • If you travel to Germany, you can use a PCR or rapid antigen test1, 2. Antibodies tests are not accepted.
          • In restaurants and other places, you can use a PCR or rapid antigen test.

          How much do tests cost?

          • Rapid antigen tests are free. You can get tested at any test location for free. Everyone can get a free tests, even visitors from other countries.
          • PCR tests cost around 50€. If you have a positive rapid antigen test, you get a free PCR test1. Children can get a free PCR test if they were in contact with an infected person1. They will receive a certificate from the Gesundheitsamt. The certificate lets them get a free PCR test at one of the 12 official testing centres.

          Types of coronavirus tests

          There are 3 types of coronavirus tests in Berlin1.

          • PCR test (PCR-Abstrichtest or Labortest)
            This is the standard test. The test is send to a laboratory, and the results come 1 or 2 days later. It's slower, but more reliable than a rapid antigen test. It's better at detecting coronavirus1. When you fly to another country, you sometimes need a PCR test.
          • Rapid Antigen Test (Schnelltest or rapid lateral flow test)
            This test gives results in a few minutes1. It is cheaper and faster, but it's not as reliable as PCR tests. It might not detect that you are infected, especially in the first week after you were infected1. You can use a rapid antigen test to get out of quarantine, or before visiting a business or event that requires a test.
          • Antibody test (Antikörper-Test)
            This only tells you if you had coronavirus before. Those tests are not very common.

          Where to ask questions

          If you have coronavirus symptoms, or questions about getting tested, call one of the coronavirus hotlines.