This page tells you where, when and how to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Berlin. It is updated when there is new information. If you live in another German state, the rules are different.

When will I get the vaccine?

It depends on your priority group. There are 4 priority groups, plus children1:

  1. Highest priority - since last December
    1. People over 80 years old
    2. People who care for the elderly
    3. Highly vulnerable patients
  2. High priority - since April
    1. People between 70 and 79 years old
    2. Residents and employees of refugee centres
    3. Residents and employees of homeless shelters
    4. Teachers and kindergarten employees
    5. People with certain illnesses like cancer, diabetes and phycological illnesses
    6. People in certain public-facing jobs
    7. People in certain critical jobs
  3. Increased priority - since May 31
    1. People between 60 and 69 years old
    2. People with certain chronic illnesses
  4. Everyone over 18 years old - since April 22 (AstraZeneca only), since June 7 (all vaccines)
  5. Children from 12 to 18 years old - from the middle of June1, 2

People in priority groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 can ask for any vaccine. You can get an appointment at the doctor or at a vaccination centre. You don't need to an invitation, just an appointment. Vaccination appointments can be hard to find, so it can still take a few weeks to get vaccinated. There are also neighbourhood vaccination drives. Every weekend, they vaccinate people who live in that neighbourhood, without appointments.

Children from 12 to 18 years old can get vaccinated from the middle of June1.

You can see the vaccination progress in Berlin and in Germany. It's very fast now.

Useful links:

How much does the vaccine cost?

The vaccine is free for all German residents1. Your health insurance pays for it1. Both private and public health insurance cover for the coronavirus vaccine1.

Where can I get vaccinated?

You can get vaccinated at a vaccination centre, or at the doctor. There are also vaccination drives in different neighbourhoods every weekend.

At the vaccination centre

You can get vaccinated at a vaccination centre (Impfzentrum). You can be in any priority group, and you don't need an invitation1, but you need an appointment. Appointments are hard to find. This tool can help you find an appointment.

There are 6 vaccination centres in Berlin:

Useful links:

At the doctor

You can also get the vaccine from a doctor. Since June 7, there is no priority requirement for the vaccine. Anyone can get any type of vaccine.

You can just call or email a doctor and ask for it. The doctor will put you on their waiting list. You can use this message template.

To find an appointment, you must contact doctors one by one. There is no central appointment service. Many general practitioners (Hausarzt) offer the vaccine. Other kinds of doctors (surgeons, gynaecologists, etc.) also offer the vaccine.

It's very hard to find an appointment1, 2, 3. You must contact many clinics. Most clinics have very long waiting lists1, because many people want the vaccine. Each clinic has different rules for who goes on the waiting list1. Follow the instructions on their website.

Useful links:

At work

Since June 7, company doctors (Betriebsärzte) can also vaccinate employees1, 2. Company doctors can offer any type of vaccine.

In your neighbourhood

The city organises neighbourhood vaccination drives (Schwerpunktimpfung) every weekend. People who live in selected neighbourhoods can get vaccinated without an appointment. If you live in that neighbourhood, you will get a notification in your mailbox. I also announce those events on the coronavirus news page.

During the vaccine appointment

At the vaccination centre

Arrive at the vaccination centre 5 minutes before your appointment. Bring these documents1:

  • Your personal ID (your passport or residence permit)
  • Invitation letter, or proof of eligibility (Impfberechtig) for the vaccine
  • The filled medical history questionnaire (Anamnesebogen)
  • The signed consent form (Einverständniserklärung)
  • Your vaccination pass (Impfpass or Impfausweis)
    This is a small yellow book that lists all the vaccines you received. You can get one for free from your doctor, or from the Gesundheitsamt1, 2. Some doctors do not have them. You can also buy it online. When you get the vaccine, they add it to your vaccination pass. If you don't have your vaccination pass, they will give you a small receipt instead.

At the vaccination centre, they should speak English, French, Turkish and German1. The appointment lasts 60 to 90 minutes1. After the vaccination, they will update your vaccination pass (Impfausweis).

You do not need to book a second appointment for your second dose. It is booked automatically with the first one1.

At the doctor

Before you get vaccinated, the doctor will explain how the vaccine works: the process, the risks, the side effects. You can ask questions. The doctor visit takes around 60 minutes, waiting included. During your visit, you should already get an appointment for your second dose.

To get vaccinated at the doctor, you must bring1...

  • The medical history and consent form (Anamnese und Impfeinwilligungserklärung)
    Print and fill the form before you go to the doctor. You can download it from the Robert Koch Institut website. The form is available in 22 languages. Select the correct form for your vaccine (BioNTech/Pfizer, Moderna or AstraZeneca).
  • Your vaccination pass (Impfpass or Impfausweis)
    This is a small yellow book that lists all the vaccines you received. You can get one for free from your doctor, or from the Gesundheitsamt1, 2. Some doctors do not have them. You can also buy it online or at any Apotheke1. When you get the vaccine, they add it to your vaccination pass. If you don't have your vaccination pass, they will give you a small receipt instead.
  • Your health insurance card

After the vaccine

Side effects

After you get the vaccine, you must wait 15 to 30 minutes before you leave, in case you don't feel well1. The vaccines can have side effects. The doctor will explain the side effects of the virus to you. You can also read the information sheet from the Robert Koch Institut.

Some common side effects can last a day or two, so you should plan a sick day. If you have serious side effects, call 112.

Useful links:

Second dose

A few weeks after your first dose, you must get a second dose (except for the Johnson & Jonhson vaccine). The recommended wait time is different for each vaccine1, and it sometimes changes. Normally, you should automatically get an appointment for your second dose.

Official resources